Potter NCIP Awards

 What is NCIP?  
Since 1963, the Nebraska Community Improvement Program (NCIP) has assisted communities in meeting challenges while building on the vitality of their strengths and resources. 

"At the very heart of NCIP is the voluntary spirit which energizes and motivates people to act at the community and regional level," said Dr. Doyle Howitt, chair of the NCIP Advisory Committee. 

NCIP recognizes the leadership, community and economic development efforts of Nebraska's communities and multi-communities. These communities organize to plan their future, set goals, determine priorities and implement project action plans.

By participating in NCIP and involving citizens in planning projects, Nebraska communities:  Develop technology centers, Implement recycling programs, Promote regional tourism, Revitalize main streets, Create new leadership, Build and assist local businesses. 

NCIP communities document community and project accomplishments and submit project write-ups or a report book toward the end of August. Awards are presented at the NCIP Recognition Banquet in November.

Recognition by NCIP has benefited us by letting the rest of the state know what western Nebraska has to offer. Participating in NCIP has helped us pool our resources and volunteers, and provided opportunities to identify people to work on projects.

2003 Nebraska Community Improvement Program awards

Potter became the first Nebraska town to receive the coveted Otto Hoiberg Award for a third time, all in the past ten years and the second time in three years. Since 1994, Potter had earned about two dozen NCIP awards. The Hoiberg Award goes to an NCIP community for the best overall community development process.

The Marilyn Ristine Leadership Award, went to Kirk Enevoldsen of Potter. The award recognizes a long time community volunteer who exhibits exemplary leadership qualities.

Potter was cited for its Youth Involvement and Leadership Development for beautification projects that involved students painting murals on walls of buildings in the community and for a tree planting project.  Potter’s Community Development Award ingredients included the ongoing Potter-Dix High School Community Improvement Class, beautification and planting more than 80 trees, and a reading garden with a gazebo, benches and lighting. The Potter Historical Foundation completed projects that preserve the community’s history and promote the downtown business district.  A current Potter Historical Foundation project is converting the old downtown hardware store building into a community meeting place and restoring an antique duckpin bowling alley on the building’s second floor. That building will provide a community resource to recruit new businesses to the downtown.

Judges said the Potter NCIP Survivor theme and motto of “Outwork, Outplay and Outlast” aptly reflected the community’s accomplishments.

Past Awards:

The Otto Hoiberg Award  (2001)  went to Potter. NCIP judges were impressed with Potter's approach to community improvement, writing that "residents of all ages, from youth to seniors, discuss community improvement on a daily basis." Potter's determination and capacity to establish and enact a plan is responsible for helping achieve its identified goals. The award is named for Dr. Otto Hoiberg for his dedication to community and economic development throughout Nebraska during his tenure at the University of Nebraska.
Class I: Population 350 and under (2001)— Potter (308). Potter was praised for being an active community that incorporates a broad base of volunteer involvement. Noteworthy projects included the Potter-Dix High School Community Involvement Class; Senior Housing; Historical Foundation; Warning System; and a variety of youth and beautification projects.

Leadership Development

Volunteer and Leadership Development

Painting of “POTTER” Rocks ........................................... Potter (1999)

Youth Involvement and Leadership Development

“Pailing Out” The Potter Sundry ....................................... Potter (1999)

Potter-Dix High School Community Involvement Class... Potter (2001)

Potter-Dix High School students were given the chance to enroll in a course that promoted community involvement. Grades were based on the hours of community service accomplished. Project accomplishments  included repainting 30 street signs around town, mentoring grade-school students, planting  flowers, cleaning up litter, and adding “reuse” bins to the school recycling program.

Teammates ......................................................................... Potter (1999)

Community Development

Public Works, Facilities and Services

Relocation of Organic Landfill .......................................... Potter (2000)

Community Services

Assisted Living and Senior Centers

Western Sky Villa .............................................................. Potter (2001)
The Potter Community Improvement Group decided that the senior population was vital to the well-being of the community. Plans were created to construct duplex housing with senior interests in mind. Volunteers attended seminars on housing, surveyed the town for available lots, and helped prepare the sites for construction. Housing grants through various organizations funded the project.

Health, Medical, and Safety

Warning Siren/Warning System ........................................ Potter (2001)

Close encounters with severe storms prompted Potter to purchase a new siren system. Volunteers were involved in raising funds, research, and implementation of the project. A story published in the local volunteer newspaper, a youth yard sale, free radio exposure, and a softball tournament all contributed to the fund-raising efforts.

Miscellaneous

American legion Hall Big Screen Projection TV .............. Potter (1999)

Sports and Recreation

Save the Sand Volleyball Court......................................... Potter (1999)

Trees and Forestry

Community Forestry Project.............................................. Potter (1999)

Lincoln Highway Tree Linc............................................... Potter (2001)

Concern with the appearance of the entrance to the community prompted efforts to beautify the historical Lincoln Highway. The concept of an avenue of trees generated the most buzz, and the Community Enhancement Program set out to start the project. Funding was generated from grant money and local keno money. Volunteers helped research and write the grant, were instrumental in the design process, and provide labor for the maintenance of the trees.

Arts and Humanities
Mellerdrama ……………………………………………… Potter (2002)

Business Assistance and Development

Business Promotion

Sugar Plum Holiday Craft Fair .......................................... Potter (1999)

Business Retention and Expansion

Historical Foundation ........................................................ Potter (2001)
Concern over losing a historical business prompted local Potter residents to promote and sustain a local landmark. A nonprofit foundation was created by a local doctor to ensure the survival of the business. The foundation recruited community members to operate the business, with funding supplies coming from various donations and volunteer hours.

 


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